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Kansas dentist helps professor friend with Neanderthal toothaches

  • ADA News
Since graduating from dental school in 1983, Dr. Joseph R. Gatti has seen thousands of patients and performed thousands of procedures at his practice. But, he jokes, what he'll probably be known for the rest of his life is being "the Neanderthal dentist."
Lawrence, Kan. — Since graduating from dental school in 1983, Dr. Joseph R. Gatti has seen thousands of patients and performed thousands of procedures at his practice.

But, he jokes, what he'll probably be known for the rest of his life is being "the Neanderthal dentist."

That's after newspapers around the globe — ranging from his hometown paper to The Washington Post and The Independent (in England) — reported on a unique Neanderthal study led by his friend and dental patient David Frayer, Ph.D., professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Kansas. Dr. Frayer's study was co-authored by Dr. Gatti, Janet Monge, Ph.D., of the University of Pennsylvania and Davorka Radovčić, Ph.D, curator at the Croatian Natural History Museum in the Croatian capital, Zagreb.

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"State":"AK"